I normally use PuPHPet to configure my Vagrant boxes.
On my latest box using CentOS 5.6 the setup worked normally, but when trying to run my application I was getting the Class ‘Memcache’ not found error.

Usually this is a simple fix, just go in and type:

sudo yum install -y php-memcached

However, this time round the above was giving me the following error:

Transaction Check Error:
file /usr/lib64/libhashkit.so.2.0.0 conflicts between attempted installs of libmemcached-last-libs-1.0.18-2.el6.remi.x86_64 and libmemcached10-1.0.16-1.ius.centos6.x86_64
file /usr/lib64/libmemcached.so.11.0.0 conflicts between attempted installs of libmemcached-last-libs-1.0.18-2.el6.remi.x86_64 and libmemcached10-1.0.16-1.ius.centos6.x86_64
file /usr/lib64/libmemcachedutil.so.2.0.0 conflicts between attempted installs of libmemcached-last-libs-1.0.18-2.el6.remi.x86_64 and libmemcached10-1.0.16-1.ius.centos6.x86_64

After smashing my head against the desk a few times during numerous attempts at installing the module, reprovisioning the vagrant box and anything else I could think of doing to fix it, I tried something that hadn’t occurred to me before; to install the dependency it was complaining about first.

Using the following commands fixed my issue, and should also work for you:

sudo yum install -y libmemcached-last
sudo yum install -y php-memcached
sudo service php-fpm restart

Hope this helps!

If you’ve ever come across Prezi you may have been slightly wow-ed by it’s amazing little transition effects as you browse through each little presentation.

image

Now, there’s a free and open-source JavaScript library called Impress.js (the author says no rhyme intended!) which will blow your mind.  It’s a JavaScript adaptation of Prezi (which uses Flash), which uses CSS3 transforms and transitions to create really cool effects similar to those on Prezi, and on top of that it’s also uses CSS3 3D animations which takes things one-step further and lets you have 3D effects in your presentation too.

The downside is that at the moment it’s only guaranteed to work on the latest versions of Chrome and Safari.  Non-webkit browsers do have a fall-back mode, which is a simple display of the slides but without any of the animation.  It does work with the alpha versions of Firefox 10 and IE10 builds, so once those are out the browser support will be much better.

Whilst the browser requirements may be a deterrent for most folks, it’s amazing to see what can be achieved using CSS3 and maybe highlights the shape of things to come.

It’s certainly worth bookmarking and having a play with.

Click here for a live demo (use Chrome or Safari)
Source code on GitHub

Less CSS is a great way to develop your stylesheets for websites.  It lets you create nested rules, specify variables, functions and so much more.

To use Less on a website you have 2 options:

  1. Use JavaScript to compile on-the-fly.  This isn’t really recommended as you’re now relying on JavaScript for your website to look the way it should.  It also creates additional overhead as your page needs to load in the JS file, load your less stylesheet and finally render your stylesheet by parsing it through the Less Javascript library.
  2. Compile your Less stylesheet into CSS, and include is as a normal stylesheet.

The compilation method is obviously the best option as you get the benefits of using Less, and then using it as any other CSS stylesheet.

Whilst the compiled method might be great for when you’ve finished developing, during development you’d still have to use the Less JS method or compile your Less file into CSS each time you make modifications, which can easily become tedious.

This is where SimpLESS comes in.  SimpLess is real-time Less compiler.  You simply drag and drop your less file(s) into the app, and it recompiles your Less file into a CSS file every time you save it.

This app is totally free, open-source and available on Windows, Mac and Linux. As well as doing the compilation, it minifies your CSS too saving you precious bytes during HTTP requests.

Download SimpLESS
Fork SimpLESS on Github

Most web developers are familiar with the default dummy text generator, lipsum.  However, today I discovered an alternative text generator which creates more unique content using Twitter.

How It Works

Twipsum allows you to enter a keyword, then it finds Tweets on Twitter based on that word and combines them into paragraphed text which you can copy and paste into wherever you need it.

It’s a nice little spin on the default lorem ipsum text which we’re all probably sick of seeing.  However, bear in mind that some of the content may be a little inappropriate so it’s probably not the best idea to use it for populating a client website.

Visit Twipsum